My Own Personal Sabbath #8

Almost every Sunday since mid-May 2020 with a few exceptions, I have been taking my own personal Sabbath, where I tune out of the news and social media and turn off my ringer and all notifications on my phone on Sundays or Saturday and Sunday. In the interest of full disclosure, I do use my phone to listen to music and podcasts, and check out e-books from the library. Before, during, or after my Sabbath, I share what I am reading, listening to, or watching for that day or days.

Two weeks was the week of little things, one after another, many unexpected, that led into last weekend’s sabbath. This past week, it was, without going into details and being admittedly cryptic, one big thing (don’t worry, my wife and I and our families are all okay) that led into this weekend’s Sabbath, which already is in progress.

I’m writing this Saturday morning. It’s about 10 a.m. I’m listening to the soundtrack for the movie Drive My Car by Eiko Ishibashi. My wife is also off from work this weekend and she is in the next room, journaling and listening to the music with me. Her birthday was this past week and we had a pre-birthday celebration earlier in the week. Last night, we had a post-birthday celebration with dinner and a movie, popcorn and wine. The celebration will continue throughout this weekend and the month.

Besides journaling and meditation this weekend, I also plan on continuing to read the devotional books I chose for Lent last month, and reading and listening to Fear: Essential Wisdom for Getting through The Storm by Thich Nhat Hanh and narrated by Dan Woren. I only have about an hour left in the book and probably will finish it this weekend. As usual, I set up a playlist of podcasts set up that includes the 100th episode of Niall Breslin’s podcast, Where Is My Mind?:

On the fiction front, I have several books from which to choose, but I’m not sure yet what I’ll read, if anything this weekend. Among my choices are books by Elmore Leonard and Tim Dorsey.

Tonight we’ll probably watch some fun TV, with a bevvy of choices, including Tacoma FD, The Righteous Gemstones, and a Mystery Science Theater 3000 movie. We’ll see what we are in the mood for tonight. Tomorrow, along with my reading, I’ll be chilling out in the 21st edition of The Chill Out Tent, which is celebrating its second birthday. I’ll leave you with a sample from a recent session:

In The Rearview: February 2022

Today, with it being the second to last day of the month, I thought I’d look back at the month of February, in terms of what I read, (we) watched, and listened to this month. So here goes:

Read:

  • Fortune Favors the Dead by Stephen Spotswood
  • Stolen Focus: Why You Can’t Pay Attention–And How to Think Deeply Again by Johann Hari
  • Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

The best of the three was Stolen Focus, with the other two, okay, and I might or might not continue each series. They both were okay, but nothing I felt like I had to get the next one right now.

Not Read:

  • Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connection and the Language of Human Experience by Brene Brown

In progess:

  • Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
  • Atomic Lobster by Tim Dorsey

Watched:

  • The Afterparty (Apple)
  • Animal House (DVD)
  • CODA (Apple)
  • Forgetting Sarah Marshall (rent)
  • Ghosts (the British version) (BBCAmerica, HBO Max)
  • I Am Not Your Negro (Hulu)
  • I Love You, Man (rent)
  • Old School (rent)
  • The Righteous Gemstones (HBO Max)
  • Somebody Somewhere (HBO Max) with
  • The Seventh Seal (HBO Max, TCM)
  • Tacoma FD (HBO Max, TruTV)
  • The Tragedy of Macbeth (Apple)

All of the series, we’re in the middle of or at the beginning. The best two of the month were CODA, deservedly up for an Oscar, and I Love You, Man, which was, and is, a hidden comic gem with Jason Segel and Paul Rudd.

Not Watched:

  • Around the World in 80 Days
  • The Good Place

Sometimes with so many other things we want to watch, there’s just not enough time and with these two, that’s the case. Kim already has seen The Good Place and said it’s really good, as have many of you. I’m just not “feeling” it, I guess. *another shrug emoji* Same for Around the World in 80 Days (which Kim hasn’t seen yet either). Maybe some day, but not right now.

Listened To:

  • Once Twice Melody by Beach House
  • Summer of Soul (…Or, When The Revolution Could Not Be Televised) Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by Various Artists

Out of the two, Summer of Soul is essential listening and is the documentary, essential viewing.

So to recap, my favorites from the month:

How was your February? What did you read, watch, and/or listen to? What were your favorites of the month?

Three-day weekend at the Beach House…again, sort of

Almost every Sunday since mid-May 2020 with a few exceptions, I have been taking my own personal Sabbath, where I tune out of the news and social media and turn off my ringer and all notifications on my phone. Throughout the day and/or sometimes the next day, I share what I am reading, listening to, or watching during my Sabbath. Sometimes I extend my Sabbath by a day or two, like this weekend since I am off Monday as well, so right now I’m doing the…

At the beginning of the month, I talked about how we were going to our beach house…well, sort of, anyway. Why was the band Beach House was expected to release its latest album Once Twice Melody that Friday. However, I had the release date wrong. It’s today…

…and it fits with another three-day weekend, at least for me. Besides listening to the new album, here’s what else I have planned:

Friday night (with Kim):

  • Burger night.
  • Watch The Afterparty.
  • Watch I Love You, Man, which was produced by Ivan Reitman who died Saturday. We watched Ghostbusters, which he directed, earlier this week.

Saturday:

  • Read Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
  • Watch I Am Not Your Negro with Kim, who has been wanting me to watch this for awhile.

Sunday:

  • Read Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connection and the Language of Human Experience by Brené Brown.
  • Watch Animal House and Old School, both produced by Reitman, with Kim.

Monday:

  • Continue to read Fortune Favors the Dead by Stephen Spotswood, which I started Wednesday night and am enjoying thus far.
  • Bingewatch as much of The Good Place, that I borrowed from the library, as I can.

What are you up to this weekend? Whatchya got planned on the book, TV, and/or music front?

I’ll leave you with the aforementioned Beach House:

Going to our Beach House…sort of

Almost every Sunday since mid-May 2020 with a few exceptions, I have been taking my own personal Sabbath, where I tune out of the news and social media and turn off my ringer and all notifications on my phone. Throughout the day and/or sometimes the next day, I share what I am reading, listening to, or watching during my Sabbath.

Since this weekend is a four-day weekend for me, because I am taking a vacation day Friday, I am starting my sabbath a couple of days earlier than usual. Initially, I thought since the band Beach House has a new album Once Twice Melody coming out Friday, I’d plan a summer theme for Thursday night and Friday since Kim is also off. This morning, I learned that the album doesn’t “drop” in its entirety until next Friday, Feb. 11. But I’m still keeping the theme for the start of the weekend because I still want to.

So, late tomorrow afternoon, as Winter Storm Landon will be hitting us, we’re planning on having burgers and hot dogs and rewatching Summer of Soul. This time, we might skip to our favorite parts. Then we plan on watching some fun TV, including the latest episode of Peacemaker and some Tacoma FD.

On Friday afternoon, as my wife sleeps, I plan on reading Stolen Focus: Why You Can’t Pay Attention–and How to Think Deeply Again by Johann Hari. Then in the evening, we’ll listen to the tracks of Beach House’s new album released so far and maybe watch this concert:

Saturday will be an unofficial James Baldwin Day as I checked out Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own by Eddie S. Glaude Jr. from the library and want to read that in the afternoon. My wife has been trying to get me to watch the documentary I Am Not Your Negro, about Baldwin, for awhile now so we’ll watch that Saturday night.

Sunday, I’ll continue reading Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman, started earlier in the week. Reading it, along with watching something (yet to be decided) on PBS Passport Sunday night, will make the perfect relaxing end to the weekend.

What are you up to this weekend? Whatchya got planned on the book, TV, and/or music front?